Scroll to continue reading
Demystifying Period Myths: Old Wives' Tales About the Menstrual Cycle

Demystifying Period Myths: Old Wives' Tales About the Menstrual Cycle

For centuries, women have heard a myriad of tales about menstruation – some scientific, others far from it. These ‘old wives’ tales’ have been passed down, warping the conversation surrounding menstrual cycles. Let’s pull back the curtains and debunk some of these myths.

Discover the truth about common period myths with our in-depth look into old wives’ tales about the menstrual cycle. Learn about menstrual health, fertility, exercise during periods, and more in our comprehensive guide.

Myth 1: You Can’t Get Pregnant During Your Period

This is a widely-believed myth, but not entirely accurate. Although the chance of getting pregnant during your period is lower, it’s not zero. Sperm can live inside the body for up to five days, so if you have sex towards the end of your period and ovulate early, there’s a possibility of becoming pregnant.

“Although the likelihood of getting pregnant during menstruation is lower, it is not impossible. Always use contraception if you’re not planning for a pregnancy.” Planned Parenthood

Myth 2: Menstrual Cycles Always Last 28 Days

The “28-day cycle” is often presented as a universal standard, but in reality, menstrual cycles can vary from person to person. The average cycle can last anywhere between 21 to 35 days, and it’s completely normal for the length to change.

Fact:

  • A study found that only 13% of women have a 28-day menstrual cycle.
  • The average cycle length is approximately 29.3 days.

“Period cycles vary greatly among individuals and can even vary for each individual throughout their life.” American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Myth 3: Exercising During Your Period Is Bad

There is no evidence suggesting that exercising during your period is harmful. In fact, regular physical activity can help reduce symptoms such as cramps and mood swings. Always listen to your body and adjust your workouts accordingly.

Benefits of exercise during menstruation:

  • Reduces bloating.
  • Alleviates cramps.
  • Improves mood.

“Exercise is a recommended way to alleviate period symptoms and promote overall menstrual health.” Harvard Health

Myth 4: PMS is in Your Head

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is very real and can have physical, psychological, and behavioral symptoms. These can include mood swings, bloating, fatigue, and breast tenderness. If PMS symptoms are affecting your daily life, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional.

Myth 5: You Shouldn’t Swim While Menstruating

Some people believe that menstruating women attract sharks while swimming, or that they’ll leak blood in the water. These are both unfounded fears. It’s perfectly safe (and hygienic) to swim during your period, especially if you’re using a tampon or menstrual cup.

“Swimming during your period is perfectly safe and can even be beneficial. Don’t let menstruation keep you from enjoying water activities.” Cleveland Clinic

Wrapping Up

The conversation surrounding menstrual health has evolved, but there are still myths that need debunking. It’s important to remember that everyone’s menstrual experience is unique. Stay informed, share knowledge, and let’s continue to demystify period myths together.

Q1: Can you get pregnant if you have sex during your period?

A1: While the chances are lower, it is still possible to get pregnant during your period. Sperm can live inside the body for up to five days, so if you have sex towards the end of your period and ovulate early, there’s a possibility of becoming pregnant.

Q2: Does every woman have a 28-day menstrual cycle?

A2: No, not every woman has a 28-day cycle. Menstrual cycles can vary greatly from person to person, typically ranging between 21 to 35 days.

Q3: Is it harmful to exercise during your period?

A3: No, it is not harmful to exercise during your period. In fact, regular physical activity can help reduce symptoms such as cramps and mood swings. It’s essential to listen to your body and adjust your workouts accordingly.

Q4: Is PMS just a psychological issue?

A4: No, Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is not just psychological. PMS can cause a variety of physical, psychological, and behavioral symptoms. These can include mood swings, bloating, fatigue, and breast tenderness. If PMS symptoms are affecting your daily life, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional.

Q5: Is it unsafe or unhygienic to swim while on your period?

A5: No, it is neither unsafe nor unhygienic to swim during your period. The belief that menstruating women attract sharks or will leak blood in the water are unfounded fears. You can comfortably swim during your period, especially if you’re using a tampon or menstrual cup.

Post a Comment